Tuesday, January 02, 2007

The New Dark Age

counterpunch:
All societies have elements of myth, untruths that nevertheless serve to unite a people. But many myths serve as camouflage for evil. One of the greatest myths is that "GIs have died for our freedom." GIs have died for American empire, for the American elite's commitment to England, and for the military-industrial complex's profits. Some may have died in Korea for the freedom of South Koreans, and some may have died trying to save South Vietnamese from the North Vietnamese communists. But it is hogwash that GIs died for our freedom.

There was no prospect of North Korea attacking America in the 1950s or Vietnam attacking America in the 1960s and none today. The Nazis were defeated by Russia before US troops landed in Europe. The US never faced any threat of invasion from Germany, Italy, or Japan.

America's wars have created hysteria that endanger our freedom. Abraham Lincoln shut down the freedom of the press and arrested editors and state legislators. Woodrow Wilson arrested war critics. Franklin Roosevelt interred American citizens of Japanese descent. George W. Bush has destroyed most of the Bill of Rights. In 2006 Congress appropriated funds for building concentration camps in the US.

Recently, Newt Gingrich, the former Speaker of the House, said that freedom of speech is inconsistent with "the war on terror" If it takes a police state to fight terror, the country is lost even if Muslim terrorists are defeated. Americans have far more to fear from a homeland police state than from terrorists.


Paul Craig Roberts
was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the Reagan administration. He was Associate Editor of the Wall Street Journal editorial page and Contributing Editor of National Review. He is coauthor of The Tyranny of Good Intentions.He can be reached at: paulcraigroberts@yahoo.com

2 Comments:

Blogger Weedgardener said...

I was a little taken aback by the first paragraph of Roberts's article. "A Daughter of Time" was a piece of fiction that played with the idea that Richard III was unfairly maligned. Indeed, he was unfairly maligned, but there is no evidence that Henry VI actually killed the princes, and most historians still hold to the belief that Richard did it. Speculation about who really killed them--or if they actually died--is a favorite topic of writers of historical fiction, and I've read most of them. To present this novel as fact is misleading.

Wednesday, January 3, 2007 at 9:25:00 AM PST  
Blogger steve said...

You know more about this than I ever will.

Saturday, January 6, 2007 at 12:56:00 AM PST  

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